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Sports

Hurling, Camogie, Gaelic football

Gaelic Football is a field game which has developed as a distinct game similar to the progression of Australian Rules. Gaelic Football is played on a pitch up to 145m long and 90m wide. The goalposts are the same shape as on a rugby pitch, with the crossbar lower than a rugby one and slightly higher than a soccer one. The ball used in Gaelic Football is round, slightly smaller than a soccer ball. It can be carried in the hand for a distance of four steps and can be kicked or “hand-passed”, a striking motion with the hand or fist. After every four steps the ball must be either bounced or “solo-ed”, an action of dropping the ball onto the foot and kicking it back into the hand. You may not bounce the ball twice in a row. To score, you put the ball over the crossbar by foot or hand / fist for one point or under the crossbar and into the net by foot or the hand / fist in certain circumstances for a goal, the latter being the equivalent of three points. Each team consists of 15 players, lining out as per the diagram. Officials for a game comprise of a referee, two linesmen (to indicate when the ball leaves the field of play at the side and to mark ’45’ free kicks and four umpires (to signal scores, assist the referee in controlling the games, and to assist linesmen in positioning ’45’ frees). A goal is signalled by raising a green flag, placed to the left of the goal. A point is signalled by raising a white flag, placed to the right of goal. A ’45’ is signalled by the umpire raising his/her outside arm. A ‘square ball’, when a player scores having arrived in the ‘square’ prior to receiving the ball, is signalled by pointing at the small parallelogram.

There are many different skills involved in the game of football.

The skills can be broadly broken down into those that involve Gaining Possession, Maintaining Possession, Releasing Possession and Contesting Possession. Many of these skills can be performed on the ground, without the need to get the ball into the hand and out of the hand.

Gaining Possession
Involves gaining possession and control of the football. Thus, skills such as catching and lifting are included.

Maintaining Possession
Once the football is under the control of the player, there are a number of skills which help the player in possession to maintain possession. These skills encompass soloing skills and evasion skills.

Releasing Possession
Involves releasing the football, with either the hand or the foot. All of these skills should be performed and developed using both the left and right hand and foot.

Contesting Possession
Involves many of the skills used to tackle an opponent in possession, or to contest for possession when neither player is in possession of the football. It should be noted that this method of “grouping” skills is only a suggestion, and there are a number of different ways of matching the skills together.

Gaining PossessionMaintaining Possession Releasing PossessionContesting Possession 
The Crouch LiftThe Bounce The Fist PassSide to Side Charge
The High CatchThe Toe TapThe Hand PassChecking/Shadowing
The Body CatchThe Feint/Side step The Punt KickThe Near /Hand Tackle
The Low CatchEvasion/Roll offThe Hook Kick The Block Down
The Reach CatchThe Penalty Kick

Source: GAA Website

Hurling is believed to be the world’s oldest field game. When the Celts came to Ireland as the last ice age was receding, they brought with them a unique culture, their own language, music, script and unique pastimes. One of these pastimes was a game now called hurling. It features in Irish folklore to illustrate the deeds of heroic mystical figures and it is chronicled as a distinct Irish pastime for at least 2,000 years. The stick, or “hurley” (called camán in Irish) is curved outwards at the end, to provide the striking surface. The ball or “sliotar” is similar in size to a hockey ball but has raised ridges. Hurling/Camogie the ladies version of hurling is played on a pitch that can be up to 145m long and 90m long. The goalposts are similar to those used on a rugby pitch, with the crossbar lower than in rugby and slightly higher than a soccer one.You may strike the ball on the ground, or in the air. Unlike hockey, you may pick up the ball with your hurley and carry it for not more than four steps in the hand. After those steps you may bounce the ball on the hurley and back to the hand, but you are forbidden to catch the ball more than twice. To get around this, one of the skills is running with the ball balanced on the hurley To score, you put the ball over the crossbar with the hurley or under the crossbar and into the net by the hurley for a goal, the latter being the equivalent of three points. Each team is made up of 15 players with match officials and scoring values the same as in Gaelic Football.

There are many different skills involved in the game of hurling. One renowned hurling coach outlined over 170 skills in the game! The skills can be broadly broken down into those that involve Gaining Possession, Maintaining Possession, Releasing Possession and Contesting Possession.

Gaining Possession
Involves gaining possession and control of the sliotar. Thus, skills such as catching, and lifting are included along with skills involved in getting control of the sliotar using the hurley.

Maintaining Possession
Once the sliotar is under the control of the player, there are a number of skills which help the player in possession to maintain possession. These skills encompass ground skills, handling skills and evasion skills.

Releasing Possession
Involves striking the sliotar, with either the hand or the hurley. Many of these skills can be performed with a stationary sliotar or a moving sliotar, while the player is stationary or while the player is moving.

Contesting Possession
Involves many of the skills used to tackle an opponent in possession, or to contest for possession when neither player is in possession of the sliotar.

It should be noted that this method of “grouping” skills is only a suggestion that may help coaches to ensure that as many skills as possible are developed, and there are a number of different ways of matching the skills together.

Gaining PossessionMaintaining PossessionReleasing PossessionContesting Possession
The Ground BlockThe DribbleStriking a Stationary BallThe Frontal Air Block
Controlling a Moving BallThe Solo RunGround Strike on the RunThe Hook
Blocking a Ball OverheadEvasion/Roll Off Doubling BackShoulder to Shoulder Clash
The Chest CatchThe Feint/Side StepStriking from the HandThe Frontal Ground Block
The Jab LiftThe Overhead StrikeThe Ground Flick
The Roll LiftThe Hand PassBatting a Ball Overhead
The Overhead CatchChecking/Shadowing

Source: GAA Website